Nick Rawle Photography

News

Studio updates.

Freedom of Movement 10 - Riga.

“I want my children to have dual nationality; I want us to be able to travel as a family, to Yorkshire, where I grew up, and back here to Latvia - where they were born - without any problems.”

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Nick Rawle
Freedom of Movement 9 - Utrecht.

Giles Brodie. Utrecht, Netherlands.
”Dad’s told me I should get a Dutch passport: I’ve never thought about it before. I’ve never needed to. I’ve been everywhere in Europe on a UK passport. That’s going to disappear.”

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Nick Rawle
Freedom of Movement 8 - Koblenz.

Selena and Frank, Koblenz.
”For ages I was asking this man in Dover for a coffee, and he was just staring at me, blankly. Frank pointed out that I was asking for coffee in German. I hadn’t realised. It happens a fair bit.”

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Nick Rawle
Freedom of Movement 7 - Luxembourg.

“My father always tells the same jokes. Bratislava is right on the border between Slovakia - Czechoslovakia as it was then - and Austria. Back in the communist days, every time we passed the road to Vienna from Bratislava, he would point and say “That’s the road to freedom”.
Everyone who grew up in The West takes for granted something that we dreamed of and fought for.

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Nick Rawle
Freedom of Movement 5 - Barcelona.

"I don't feel English anymore. I haven't lived there in such a long time, so when I go 'home' it doesn't feel like home. Everything's changed. But I don't feel I belong anywhere. Maybe nationality is not the best way to describe identity? I'm a dancer - dancing is where I feel I belong." 

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Nick Rawle
Freedom of Movement 4 - Carlow.

Ann Mulrooney - CEO, Visual Carlow.
Nobody in Ireland wants the UK to leave the EU, it will hurt everyone, but the Irish won’t let that stop them having a good relationship with the remaining 26 countries. Talent will still come from all over and receive a warm welcome here.

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Nick Rawle
Freedom of Movement 3 - Cliffs of Moher.

Joshka and Sophia. Journeymen cabinet makers from Germany. He was over five years on the road, she just about three and a half.
The tradition states that you leave home with the basics - some of your tools, a staff, your one set of clothes which denote your membership of a particular trades guild and no more than ten Euros. The minimum length of journey is three years and one day. You may - and should - go far and wide. You may return with no more money than you left with and must support yourself through your labours.

It’s no holiday, and although it’s now relatively uncommon it’s still a respected and widely understood rite of passage.

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Nick Rawle